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Homesteading classes to be held at Niagara Cooperative Extension

March 12th, 2016

Homesteading classes to be held at Niagara Cooperative Extension
Cornell Cooperative Extension of Niagara County will start a series of homesteading classes this month designed to get you the most from the land you call home. Individual classes will cost $ 10 to $ 20 and cover topics that include organic gardening …
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Whether farming or homesteading, love of land unites local food producers
Following a military career he said he pursued to ensure a steady pension to help fund future homesteading plans, Young settled in central Maine about 10 years ago on 150 acres, where he and his wife Bonnie live off the grid and raise fiddleheads …
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Yogurt making, backyard chicken rearing, weaving part of homesteading workshop
The buzz gave rise to a series of homesteading classes that will start March 31 with a class Henning and Jen Regan, an Extension community educator, will teach on yogurt and butter making. Henning – who with her husband, Scott, bought a 26-acre farm in …
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Raising Backyard Turkeys – A DIY Project For Your Own Self Sufficiency

March 12th, 2016

Homesteading refers to the practice of raising poultry or farming for your own sufficiency. Many families, especially those that have a little space within their estates have found homesteading as a productive and rewarding activity. From planting fruits and vegetables to raising backyard turkeys, any form of homesteading requires a small capital but results in big savings on the family’s food expenses.

Most families begin their homesteading project with planting easy-to-grow plant foods, and then graduate to raising backyard turkeys after some time. This is because raising backyard turkeys requires a lot more commitment and technical knowledge than farming. As such, it is advisable that you have some level of experience already before you try it out.

If you are considering raising turkeys in your backyard, the first thing you need to find out is whether you have enough space for growing turkey poults. For starters, we recommend five as a good number, especially if you are not planning to sell your produce commercially. A five-poult stock should require just a small space, more so if you are not planning for them to interbreed. When preparing your turkeys’ living space, you need to remember to have provisions for putting heat lamps. Turkeys are sensitive to temperature changes and do not like cold weather one bit. Keeping them healthy requires that they get as much heat as they need every day.

Let us say you have their living space all set and ready. What do you need to do next? You need to get a good, healthy stock of poults in the right number. There are breeders that sell and deliver newly hatched turkey poults by mail. They may work, but the long travel is bound to put the poults in a stressful condition. As such, if there is a local breeder that you can order from, it is recommended to get the stock that you need from them instead.

Once you get your turkey poults from your preferred breeder, the next thing you need to think about is feeding them with the right amount of feeds. This requires some in-depth research, as you need to find out the nutrients, vitamins and minerals that your turkeys need to reach their full growth potential. But this part becomes easy once you figure out the right mix. Raising backyard turkeys is an exciting project for anyone who loves farming. For your project to be successful, however, you need to make sure that you have enough time to devote to your turkeys and the right amount of resources to set it up.

If you think you still need guidance on rearing turkeys, consulting existing turkey owners and farmers will certainly be a big help. Pick up more about raising baby turkeys and turkeys correctly here: www.howtoraiseturkeys.com

Florahome Station

Antiques, Vintage, Gourmet Foods and Unique Items